You can’t beat a good book.

Whether it be about business, marketing, technology, an autobiography, there’s nothing like diving into a world of new knowledge, realisations and opportunities.

Every month I will be providing a short and sweet snapshot of the books I’ve read for the month, along with a brief overview and review.

So, albeit quite late, let’s get started on our first book wrap for the month of May 2017.

What did I read this month?

So what were my thoughts on each?

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

In Grit, Angela Duckworth provides an overview of just what it takes to succeed in all walks of life and how grit by far outweighs talent.

With a selection of case scenarios, principles and anecdotes to back up her research, Angela has written a thoroughly enjoyable and eye opening book that from my reading is fitting for anyone aiming to succeed and achieve in their life.

Whilst the book goes deep on research of people who have succeeded due to grit, and how they went about their success it doesn’t delve as much into the ‘how-to’ when it comes to building Grit.

My one complaint with this book? It can get a bit ‘samey’ as you progress through. It doesn’t take long to collar on to what she’s saying and you don’t really need to be told over and over to realise that as long as you have grit and perseverance you will be on your way to succeeding.

Would I recommend it? Yes, it’s well worth a read to really get those juices flowing and to refocus when things are hectic and opportunities are flying at you from all over the place.

Key Person of Influence

 

Key Person of Influence book

Written by popular author and speaker Daniel Priestley, Become a Key Person of Influence delves into the how’s, why and how to on becoming an influencer within your chosen space.

As Daniel states, within every industry there are names that are synonymous with the market and it’s participants. When you think of social you’ll often hear about Gary Vaynerchuk, air travel – Richard Branson.

It’s relatively short as books go, coming in at just under 200 pages¬†so is well worth diving into for the time it takes. Broken down into 5 sections the advice and principles are concise.

In it’s simple form, the advice within the book isn’t ground breaking but it’s organised in a fashion that makes for easy digesting and action off of the back of it. With that in mind, I’d happily recommend having a read.

#AskGaryVee

AskGaryVee book

Bought to us by a man who probably needs no introduction, #AskGaryVee is a collection of some of the greatest questions and answers to be posed on the AskGaryVee show.

If you have watched any of Gary’s content you’ll know that he is glaringly upfront and honest with the answers he gives to questions posed to him. It’s refreshing and allows for enjoyable reading in this book.

Broken down into chapters that cover everything from getting started, through influencer marketing, leadership, gratitude and even sports and wine you get to see the uncensored mind of a true business genius.

Whilst many don’t see eye to eye with his manner and way of business, you can’t deny that he’s a clever man in the way that he thinks and orchestrates his day to day.

If there’s one thing I took from this book (although there were a lot that merit a separate review), it was just how direct and simple he keeps things to ensure quick progression without the fluff of perfectionism.

I’d recommend this book to any one in the business or marketing world as an easy yet super insightful read that really motivates.

Mindset

Mindset book

I personally found value in this book after recently becoming a new¬†parent to my little lad. If there was one thing that came from it, it was the clear distinction and idea of teaching your kids to grow up realising that they aren’t limited by their ability but merely their mindset.

Without spoiling anything, this book takes a look into two mindsets – the fixed mindset and the growth mindset. One which takes the victim mentality and the other that allows failure, evolution and growth.

With little anecdotes, case scenarios and primers on how to harvest a growth mindset, I’d definitely recommend this book.

My one downfall? It get’s a little bit repetitive, however, for the time taken to read through I have no regrets in reading it.

What are you reading?

What are you or have you been reading? I’m always on the look out for recommendations, no matter what genre or style so get them listed in the comments below!

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